January 3-5 Mendelssohn-Hensel, Mendelssohn and Dvořàk

ShiYeon Sung conducts Mendelssohn-Hensel, Mendelssohn and Dvořàk featuring Ingrid Fliter, piano
Returning to Symphony Hall for the first time since her tenure as BSO assistant conductor, Korean-born Shiyeon Sung leads a program juxtaposing music of Fanny Mendelssohn-Hensel and her brother Felix, surely one of the most brilliant sibling pairs in music history.

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TICKETS: January 3, 8PM

TICKETS: January 4, 1:30PM

TICKETS: January 5, 8PM

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About the Music: Podcasts & Program Notes

Check back for the latest Podcasts!
Program notes are generally posted the week of the performance date.

Watch/Listen

  • Brian Bell takes a snapshot of the January 3-5, 2019 program.
  • Video Promo by Anthony Princiotti.
  • Video Podcast by Anthony Princiotti.
  • Audio Concert Preview written by Marc Mandel and Robert Kirzinger
  • Former BSO Assistant conductor Shiyeon Sung chats with Brian Bell about making her first BSO subscription appearance in nearly 10 years.

 

Shiyeon Sung, conductor
Ingrid Fliter, piano

MENDELSSOHN-HENSEL Overture in C (11 min)
MENDELSSOHN Piano Concerto No. 1 (21 min)
DVOŘÁK Symphony No. 8 (38 min)

Returning to Symphony Hall for the first time since her tenure as BSO assistant conductor, Korean-born Shiyeon Sung leads a program juxtaposing music of Fanny Mendelssohn-Hensel and her brother Felix, surely one of the most brilliant sibling pairs in music history. Fanny Mendelssohn-Hensel's Overture in C, her only extant work for orchestra alone (though she wrote several works for chorus with orchestra), is an elegant, ten-minute piece dating from 1830. Begun in the same year, her brother's Piano Concerto No. 1 has a turbulent, Romantic energy; Argentinian pianist Ingrid Fliter is soloist, making her subscription series debut. One of the great 19th-century symphonies, Dvořák's by turns bucolic and thrilling Eighth was composed in 1889 and is arguably his most individual symphony, a departure from the Brahms-influenced Germanic style of his Symphony No. 7.