ANDRIS NELSONS LEADS THE BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA IN THREE PROGRAMS AT
CARNEGIE HALL APRIL 11, 12, & 13, 2018, AS DETAILED IN CARNEGIE HALL'S 2016-17 SEASON ANNOUNCEMENT

ANDRIS NELSONSLEADS THEBOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRAIN THREE PROGRAMS AT CARNEGIE HALL APRIL 11, 12, & 13, 2018, AS DETAILED IN
CARNEGIE HALL'S 2016-17 SEASON ANNOUNCEMENT

ANDRIS NELSONS' PROGRAMS WITH THE BSO AT CARNEGIE HALL IN SPRING 2018 INCLUDE ACT II OF WAGNER'STRISTAN UND ISOLDEWITH SOLOISTS JONAS KAUFMANN AS TRISTAN AND CAMILLA NYLUND AS ISOLDE (APRIL 12); SHOSTAKOVICH'S SYMPHONY NO. 4 AND BERNSTEIN'S SYMPHONY NO. 2, AGE OF ANXIETY, WITH PIANIST JEAN-YVES THIBAUDET (APRIL 11); AND THE NEW YORK PREMIERE OF A NEW WORK BY NOTED GERMAN COMPOSER JÖRG WIDMANN ON A PROGRAM WITH MOZART'S SYMPHONY NO. 23 AND STRAUSS'S DON QUIXOTE, FEATURING CELLIST YO-YO MA AND BSO PRINCIPAL VIOLIST STEVEN ANSELL (APRIL 13)

ANDRIS NELSONS ALSO LEADS THESE PROGRAMS DURING THE BSO'S 2017-18 SEASON AT SYMPHONY HALL; MR. NELSONS AND THE BSO WILL ANNOUNCE COMPLETE DETAILS OF THE 2017-18 BSO SEASON IN MARCH

As part of Carnegie Hall's 2017-18 season, announced on January 25, BSO Music Director Andris Nelsons and the Boston Symphony Orchestra will perform three concerts, April 11, 12, and 13, 2018. The BSO programs to be performed at Carnegie Hall in the 2017-18 season will also be featured in the BSO's 2017-18 season at Symphony Hall in Boston. Mr. Nelsons and the BSO will announce complete details of the 2017-18 BSO season in March.

APRIL 11: ANDRIS NELSONS LEADS THE BSO AND PIANIST JEAN-YVES THIBAUDET IN BERNSTEIN'S SYMPHONY NO. 2, THE AGE OF ANXIETY, ON A PROGRAM WITH SHOSTAKOVICH'S SYMPHONY NO. 4 Pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet joins Andris Nelsons and the Boston Symphony Orchestra for the first performance of their three-night engagement at Carnegie Hall in 2018 on Wednesday, April 11, for Bernstein's Symphony No. 2, The Age of Anxiety. The piece-based on W.H. Auden's 1947 poem of the same name, which Bernstein called "one of the most shattering examples of pure virtuosity in the history of English poetry"-is being performed by the BSO in 2018 as part of the celebration of Bernstein's centennial. Serge Koussevitzky and the Boston Symphony Orchestra gave the world premiere performances of the piece, with Bernstein on piano, in 1949. Mr. Nelsons also leads the BSO in Shostakovich's dark yet powerfully majestic Symphony No. 4, continuing Andris Nelsons and the BSO's survey of the composer's complete symphonies. 

 

APRIL 12: ANDRIS NELSONS LEADS THE BSO AND A CAST OF SOLOISTS, HEADLINES BY SOPRANO CAMILLA NYLUND AND TENOR JONAS KAUFMANN, IN ACT II OF WAGNER'S TRISTAN AND ISOLDE On Thursday, April 12, Andris Nelsons and the BSO are joined by a cast of vocal soloists in a concert performance of the second act of Wagner's Tristan und Isolde, the composer's musically groundbreaking, intensely Romantic masterwork. The performance features tenor Jonas Kaufmann as Tristan-making his debut in the role with these performances-and soprano Camilla Nylund as the Irish princess Isolde, along with mezzo-soprano Mihoko Fujimura (Brangäne), baritone David Kravitz (Kurwenal), and bass Georg Zeppenfeld (King Marke).

 

APRIL 13: YO-YO MA AND BSO PRINCIPAL VIOLIST STEVEN ANSELL PERFORM STRAUSS'S DON QUIXOTE WITH ANDRIS NELSONS AND THE ORCHESTRA ON A PROGRAM INCLUDING MOZART'S SYMPHONY NO. 23 AND FEATURING THE NEW YORK PREMIERE OF A NEW WORK BY JÖRG WIDMANN Closing out the BSO's three-night residency at Carnegie Hall, Andris Nelsons leads the Boston Symphony Orchestra in the New York premiere of a new work by composer Jörg Widmann (a BSO co-commission), one of Germany's most inventive musicians. Cellist Yo-Yo Ma and BSO principal violist Steven Ansell are soloists in Richard Strauss's picaresque and virtuosic tone-poem Don Quixote, which closes the concert. Also on the program is Mozart's rarely heard, charming Symphony No. 23.

 

Andris Nelsons

In 2016-17, his third season as the BSO's Ray and Maria Stata Music Director, Andris Nelsons leads the Boston Symphony Orchestra in fourteen wide-ranging subscription programs at Symphony Hall, repeating three of them at New York's Carnegie Hall, followed by two concerts in Montreal and Toronto. In the summer of 2015, following his first season as music director, his contract with the Boston Symphony Orchestra was extended through the 2021-22 season. In addition, in 2017 he becomes Gewandhauskapellmeister of the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, in which capacity he will also bring both orchestras together for a unique multi-dimensional alliance. Following the 2015 Tanglewood season, Maestro Nelsons and the BSO undertook a twelve-concert, eight-city tour to major European capitals as well as the Lucerne, Salzburg, and Grafenegg festivals. A second European tour, to eight cities in Germany, Austria, and Luxembourg, took place in May 2016.

The fifteenth music director in the history of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Andris Nelsons made his BSO debut at Carnegie Hall in March 2011 and his Tanglewood debut in July 2012. His first CD with the BSO-live recordings of Wagner's Tannhäuser Overture and Sibelius's Symphony No. 2-was released in November 2014 on BSO Classics. In 2014-15, in collaboration with Deutsche Grammophon, he and the BSO initiated a multi-year recording project entitled "Shostakovich Under Stalin's Shadow," to include live performances of Shostakovich's symphonies 5 through 10 and other works. The first disc, of Shostakovich's Symphony No. 10, won the 2016 Grammy Award for Best Orchestral Performance andGramophone Magazine's Orchestral Award. The second release, of Shostakovich's symphonies 5, 8, and 9, has received two 2017 Grammy nominations.

In the next few seasons, Andris Nelsons continues his collaborations with the Berlin Philharmonic, Vienna Philharmonic, the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam, Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, and Philharmonia Orchestra. A regular guest at the Royal Opera House, Vienna State Opera, and Metropolitan Opera, he was critically acclaimed as music director of the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra from 2008 to 2015. Under a new, exclusive contract with Deutsche Grammophon, he will record the complete Beethoven symphonies with the Vienna Philharmonic and Bruckner symphonies with the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig.

Born in Riga in 1978 into a family of musicians, Andris Nelsons began his career as a trumpeter in the Latvian National Opera Orchestra before studying conducting. He was principal conductor of the Nordwestdeutsche Philharmonie in Herford, Germany, from 2006 to 2009 and music director of the Latvian National Opera from 2003 to 2007. Mr. Nelsons is the subject of a 2013 DVD from Orfeo, a documentary film entitled "Andris Nelsons: Genius on Fire."

A Brief History of the Boston Symphony Orchestra

Now in its 136th season, the Boston Symphony Orchestra gave its inaugural concert in 1881, realizing the dream of its founder, the Civil War veteran/businessman/philanthropist Henry Lee Higginson, who envisioned a great and permanent orchestra in his hometown of Boston. In 2014, the orchestra will continue to build upon its storied history with the beginning of a new chapter as Andris Nelsons becomes the orchestra's 15th music director at the start of the BSO's 2014-15 season. 

Today the BSO reaches millions of listeners, not only through its concert performances in Boston and at Tanglewood, but also via the internet, radio, television, educational programs, recordings, and tours. It commissions works from today's most important composers; its summer season at Tanglewood in the Berkshire hills of Western Massachusetts is among the world's most important music festivals; it helps develop future audiences through BSO Youth Concerts and educational outreach programs involving the entire Boston community; and, during the Tanglewood season, it operates the Tanglewood Music Center, one of the world's most important training grounds for young professional-caliber musicians. The Boston Symphony Chamber Players, made up of BSO principals, are known worldwide, and the Boston Pops Orchestra-with its cabaret style festive atmosphere and food and drink served during the concerts-setsan international standard for performances of lighter music. The BSO's winter season and the Boston Pops holiday and spring seasons take place in Boston's Symphony Hall, widely acclaimed for its great acoustics and considered among the top concert halls in the world.

Launched in 1996, the BSO's website, bso.org, is the largest and most-visited orchestral website in the United States, receiving approximately 10 million visitors annually on its full site as well as its smart phone-/mobile device-friendly web format. The BSO is also on Facebook and Twitter, and video content from the BSO is available on YouTube. An expansion of the BSO's educational activities has also played a key role in strengthening the orchestra's commitment to, and presence within, its surrounding communities. Through its Education and Community Engagement programs, the BSO provides individuals of all backgrounds the opportunity to develop and build relationships with the BSO and orchestral music. In addition, the BSO offers a variety of free educational programs at Symphony Hall and Tanglewood, as well as special initiatives aimed at attracting young audience members.

The Boston Symphony Orchestra gave its inaugural concert on October 22, 1881, under Georg Henschel, who remained as conductor until 1884. For nearly twenty years, BSO concerts were held in the old Boston Music Hall; Symphony Hall, one of the world's most revered concert halls, opened on October 15, 1900. Henschel was succeeded by the German-born and -trained conductors Wilhelm Gericke, Arthur Nikisch, Emil Paur,and Max Fiedler, culminating in the appointment of the legendary Karl Muck, who served two tenures, 1906-08 and 1912-18. In 1915 the orchestra made its first transcontinental trip, playing thirteen concerts at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco. Henri Rabaud, engaged as conductor in 1918, was succeeded a year later by Pierre Monteux. These appointments marked the beginning of a French tradition maintained, even during the Russian-born Serge Koussevitzky's tenure (1924-49), with the employment of many French-trained musicians.

It was in 1936 that Koussevitzky led the orchestra's first concerts in the Berkshires; he and the players took up annual summer residence at Tanglewood a year later. Koussevitzky passionately shared Major Higginson's dream of "a good honest school for musicians," and in 1940 that dream was realized with the founding of the Berkshire Music Center (now called the Tanglewood Music Center).

Koussevitzky was succeeded in 1949 by Charles Munch, who continued supporting contemporary composers, introduced much French music to the repertoire, and led the BSO on its first international tours. In 1956, the BSO, under the direction of Charles Munch, was the first American orchestra to tour the Soviet Union. Erich Leinsdorf began his term as music director in 1962, to be followed in 1969 by William Steinberg. Seiji Ozawa became the BSO's thirteenth music director in 1973. His historic twenty-nine-year tenure extended until 2002, when he was named Music Director Laureate. In 1979, the BSO, under the direction of Seiji Ozawa, was the first American orchestra to tour mainland China after the normalization of relations.

Bernard Haitink, named principal guest conductor in 1995 and Conductor Emeritus in 2004, has led the BSO in Boston, New York, at Tanglewood, and on tour in Europe, as well as recording with the orchestra. Previous principal guest conductors of the orchestra included Michael Tilson Thomas, from 1972 to 1974, and the late Sir Colin Davis, from 1972 to 1984.

The first American-born conductor to hold the position, James Levine was the BSO's music director from 2004 to 2011. Levine led the orchestra in wide-ranging programs that included works newly commissioned for the orchestra's 125th anniversary, particularly from significant American composers; issued a number of live concert performances on the orchestra's own label, BSO Classics; taught at the Tanglewood Music Center; and in 2007 led the BSO in an acclaimed tour of European music festivals. In May 2013, a new chapter in the history of the Boston Symphony Orchestra was initiated when the internationally acclaimed young Latvian conductorAndris Nelsons was announced as the BSO's next music director, a position he took up in the 2014-15 season, following a year as music director designate.

Today, the Boston Symphony Orchestra continues to fulfill and expand upon the vision of its founder Henry Lee Higginson, not only through its concert performances, educational offerings, and internet presence, but also through its expanding use of virtual and electronic media in a manner reflecting the BSO's continuing awareness of today's modern, ever-changing, 21st-century world. For further information about the Boston Symphony Orchestra's many activities, visit www.bso.org.

 

TICKET INFORMATION

Tickets for the Boston Symphony Orchestra's 2017-18 appearances at Carnegie Hall are available on subscription at the Carnegie Hall Box Office, 154 West 57th Street, New York. They may also be charged to major credit cards by calling CarnegieCharge at 212-247-7800 or purchased online at the Carnegie Hall website, www.carnegiehall.org. Single tickets to Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts for the 2017-2018 season will be available in late August.

ANDRIS NELSONS AND THE BSO AT CARNEGIE HALL APRIL 11, 12, & 13, 2018
Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage

 

Wednesday, April 11, 8 p.m.

Andris Nelsons, conductor
Jean-Yves Thibaudet, piano

BERNSTEIN Symphony No. 2, The Age of Anxiety
SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 4

 

Thursday, April 12, 8 p.m.

Andris Nelsons, conductor
Camilla Nylund, soprano (Isolde)
Jonas Kaufmann, tenor (Tristan)
Mihoko Fujimura, mezzo-soprano (Brangäne)
David Kravitz, baritone (Kurwenal)
Georg Zeppenfeld, bass (Marke)

WAGNER Tristan und Isolde, Act II

 

Friday, April 13, 8 p.m.

Andris Nelsons, conductor
Yo-Yo Ma, cello
Steven Ansell, viola 

MOZART Symphony No. 23
Jörg WIDMANN New Work (New York premiere; BSO co-commission)
STRAUSS Don Quixote