Shutdown Special For You!

Furloughed Federal Employees - Join us As our guest for a BSO Concert At No cost!
We invite furloughed federal employees to join us as our guests on the following dates: January 17 - January 29. Each employee is eligible to receive a pair of tickets, based on availability, with the presentation of a valid government ID.  

Available through SymphonyCharge (888.266.1200) and at the Symphony Hall Box Office. Offer not available for previous purchases. Discount valid for concerts listed only.  Tickets will be held at the BSO Box Office.  Must present a valid Government ID when picking up tickets. 


 

Herbert Blomstedt conducts Haydn and Brahms featuring Truls Mørk, cello

BUY TICKETS: JANUARY 17, 8PM

BUY TICKETS: JANUARY 19, 8PM

BUY TICKETS: JANUARY 22, 8PM

Herbert Blomstedt, one of the great conductors of the era, returns to the BSO podium for a work central to the repertoire, Brahms's rich, complex Symphony No. 1. Grappling with the influence of Beethoven, Brahms famously delayed completing his First until well into his forties. Bearing several deliberate touches of homage to Beethoven but fully Brahmsian in its spirit and effect, it stands as one of the great works in the symphonic literature. Opening the program is Haydn's charming, genial Cello Concerto No. 1, featuring the brilliant Norwegian cellist Truls Mørk in his first appearances with the BSO since 2007.


John Storgårds conducts Kaija Saariaho, Mozart and Sibelius featuring Martin Helmchen, piano

BUY TICKETS: JANUARY 24, 8PM

BUY TICKETS: JANUARY 26, 8PM

BUY TICKETS: JANUARY 29, 8PM

Making his BSO subscription series debut, conductor John Storgårds leads pianist Martin Helmchen in Mozart's gregarious, large-scale Piano Concerto in E-flat, K.482, composed in late 1785 when Mozart was also working on his comic opera The Marriage of Figaro. The Finnish Storgårds also brings three Finnish works to Symphony Hall, beginning with Kaija Saariaho's gorgeous study of orchestral color Ciel d'hiver ("Winter Sky"), an arrangement of a movement from her earlier, symphony-like Orion. Jean Sibelius's final two symphonies, nos. 6 and 7, are two of the greatest works in the symphonic literature. Though very different from one another, both demonstrate the composer's distinctively rich orchestration and organic, fluid transformations of material.