Pops at Home: Musicians

Pops at Home: Musicians

Enjoy archival and rare videos featuring the Boston Pops!

Pops at Home | Support the Music - Donate Now


Originally presented as part of the July 4 "A Boston Pops Salute to Our Heroes" broadcast, we hope you enjoy this socially-distant rendition of Somewhere Over the Rainbow by members of the BSO Viola section

Featuring: Steven Ansell, Principal, Cathy Basrak, Assistant Principal, Danny Kim, Rebecca Gitter, Daniel Getz, Rebekah Edewards, Kathyrn Sievers, Mary Ferrillo, and Steven Laraia.

Watch on YouTube


The Typewriter is one of composer Leroy Anderson’s best-loved works, which he composed in 1950. In 1972 when the composer was the special guest on our PBS television show “Evening at Pops,” Fiedler asked Leroy Anderson to take the podium and conduct the orchestra while Fiedler played the percussive ‘carriage return’. This film in tribute to Fiedler, was inspired by that performance.

Best known for the holiday classic, Sleigh Ride, written during a heatwave in July of 1946, Leroy Anderson became the mid-century master of delightful miniature compositions, which are still beloved today for their intelligent, entertaining musicality. As John Williams has said, “When we think of the Pops we think of Leroy Anderson. We think of his light music, which fit the orchestra and fit the mood of Fiedler’s concerts and was done with such skill.”

A Massachusetts native, Anderson first came to the attention of Arthur Fiedler in the mid 1930s while director of the Harvard Band, and with Fiedler’s encouragement, many of his early compositions were premiered by the Boston Pops. Anderson went on to a successful composing and conducting career, recording his own compositions on Decca for over a decade, while maintaining a special relationship with his hometown orchestra.

Film produced by Susan Dangel and Dick Bartlett, recording by the Boston Pops Orchestra.


The Boston Pops premiered Trumpeter’s Lullaby at Spring Pops in 1950. Composer Leroy Anderson described its origins backstage at Symphony Hall, where he was talking after a concert with conductor Arthur Fiedler and principal trumpet Roger Voisin. Voisin suggested Anderson write him a solo different from most brash trumpet pieces, and Anderson said, “it occurred to me that I had never heard a lullaby for trumpet, so I set out to write one.”

Best known for the holiday classic, Sleigh Ride, written during a heatwave in July of 1946, Leroy Anderson became the mid-century master of delightful miniature compositions, which are still beloved today for their intelligent, entertaining musicality. As John Williams has said, “When we think of the Pops we think of Leroy Anderson. We think of his light music, which fit the orchestra and fit the mood of Fiedler’s concerts and was done with such skill.”

A Massachusetts native, Anderson first came to the attention of Arthur Fiedler in the mid 1930s while director of the Harvard Band, and with Fiedler’s encouragement, many of his early compositions were premiered by the Boston Pops. Anderson went on to a successful composing and conducting career, recording his own compositions on Decca for over a decade, while maintaining a special relationship with his hometown orchestra.

Thomas Rolfs, Principal Trumpet, Roberta and Stephen R. Weiner chair, endowed in perpetuity
Keith Lockhart, piano


In Bugler’s Holiday from 1954, composer Leroy Anderson said he wanted to imagine what three military buglers would do on their day off. Anderson himself was on active duty and military intelligence during WWII and the Korean War. “You’ll hear some bugle calls that may sound familiar,” he said, “but you’ll probably realize that they are NOT played regulation and they wouldn’t get away with it on post.”

Best known for the holiday classic, Sleigh Ride, written during a heatwave in July of 1946, Leroy Anderson became the mid-century master of delightful miniature compositions, which are still beloved today for their intelligent, entertaining musicality. As John Williams has said, “When we think of the Pops we think of Leroy Anderson. We think of his light music, which fit the orchestra and fit the mood of Fiedler’s concerts and was done with such skill.”

A Massachusetts native, Anderson first came to the attention of Arthur Fiedler in the mid 1930s while director of the Harvard Band, and with Fiedler’s encouragement, many of his early compositions were premiered by the Boston Pops. Anderson went on to a successful composing and conducting career, recording his own compositions on Decca for over a decade, while maintaining a special relationship with his hometown orchestra.

Thomas Rolfs, Principal Trumpet, Roberta and Stephen R. Weiner chair, endowed in perpetuity
Benjamin Wright
Thomas Siders, Associate Principal Trumpet
Michael Martin


In honor of Massachusetts’ graduating classes of 2020, Members of the Boston Pops perform a virtual performance of Elgar’s traditional graduation march. Despite the ending the school year during a pandemic and with a challenging reckoning of our nation’s history, we celebrate the achievements, current and future, of the young adults of our commonwealth, and wish much success and perseverance for them going forward.  

This performance was also part of the Massachusetts Commencement 2020 broadcast on WGBH, co-presented by Governor Charlie Baker.

Edward Elgar’s Pomp And Circumstance March #1 (1901), known in the US as Land of Hope and Glory, (which are the first lines of the words poet Arthur Benson added to it) started as a patriotic British anthem, still much-loved and used in England. In 1905, the composer was invited to receive an honorary doctorate at Yale, and his march was played as the commencement recessional. The faculty loved the piece and adopted it annually; other universities followed, and it became widespread over the next two decades- now it is nearly ubiquitous, from kindergarten through college.

Film produced by Susan Dangel and Dick Bartlett, virtual recording by Members of the Boston Pops. 


Violin or fiddle? How about both? Explore the world of fiddling with Pops violinist Bonnie Bewick. You may even want to give it a try!


In the 2013 Spring Pops Season, which celebrated film music, the Boston Cello Quartet premiered a new commission with the orchestra titled "License to Trill: Concertino on Bond Themes." The Boston Cello Quartet is made up of Boston Pops and Boston Symphony cellists Blaise Dejardin, Adam Esbensen, Mihail Jojatu, and Alexandre Lecarme. (5/23/13)

"License to Trill: Concertino on Bond Themes" arranged by Chris Walden. 

Back to Pops at Home