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Ken-David Masur conducts Vivaldi, Krommer, Jolivet, Rota and
Schumann featuring members of the BSO

Ken-David Masur conducts Vivaldi, Krommer, Jolivet, Rota and Schumann featuring members of the BSO

Boston Symphony Orchestra

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Soloists from the ranks of the Boston Symphony Orchestra take center stage in this highly unusual, far-ranging program led by BSO Assistant Conductor Ken-David Masur. BSO piccoloist Cynthia Meyers performs Vivaldi's delightful Piccolo Concerto in C. BSO principal clarinet William Hudgins and clarinetist Michael Wayne are soloists in Mozart-contemporary Franz Krommer's Concerto No. 2 for two clarinets. BSO principal trumpet Thomas Rolfs is soloist in French composer André Jolivet's Concertino for trumpet, piano, and strings, a dynamic, three-movement work from 1948. BSO principal trombone Toby Oft plays the Trombone Concerto of Italian composer Nino Rota-best known for scoring Coppola's The Godfather but a versatile and prolific composer of concert and stage works as well. Finally, Robert Schumann's Konzertstück ("Concert-piece") for four horns provides an exhilarating showcase for principal horn James Sommerville and his virtuoso colleagues Rachel Childers, Jason Snider, and Michael Winter.

Featured Performers

Ken-David Masur, conductor
Ken-David Masur, conductor View biography in full page >

Boston Symphony Orchestra Associate Conductor Ken-David Masur makes his debut with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra at Ravinia in summer 2018, leading two all-Tchaikovsky programs, then returns to Tanglewood to conduct the Boston Symphony Orchestra in music of Glinka, Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2 with Kirill Gerstein, and Stravinsky's Firebird. He travels to Tokyo at summer's end to conduct workshops and a concert celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Mendelssohn Foundation in Japan. In October 2018 he leads a subscription week with the BSO. Guest engagements in the coming season include those with the Louisville Orchestra, Detroit Symphony, and Chicago Civic Orchestra, plus concerts abroad with the National Philharmonic of Russia, Collegium Musicum Basel, Stavanger Symphony, and Mulhouse Symphony Orchestra in France. Recent performance highlights include weeks with the Milwaukee, Colorado, and Portland (ME) symphonies and returns to the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl, Chicago Civic Orchestra, Munich Symphony, where he is Principal Guest Conductor, and the Yomiuri Nippon Symphony Orchestra in Japan. He led l' Orchestre National de France in Paris in a program with Anne-Sophie Mutter, and regularly conducts in Germany, Korea, and Moscow. As a sought-after leader and educator of younger players, Mr. Masur frequently conducts the Chicago Civic Orchestra, Boston University Tanglewood Institute orchestra, and the New England Conservatory, and Tanglewood Music Center Orchestras.

Ken-David Masur and his wife, pianist Melinda Lee Masur, are founders and Artistic Directors of the Chelsea Music Festival, an annual two-week multimedia production of music, art, and cuisine, which in June 2018 presented its 9th season, "Bach 333," in New York City. Its productions are varied and internationally themed, always including premieres of new works by young and established composers. The New York Times frequently features the festival amongst its Best Classical picks of the season.

In 2011 Ken-David Masur was the recipient of the Seiji Ozawa Conducting Fellowship at Tanglewood, where he was invited to return as a Fellow in 2012. He made his Boston Symphony Orchestra debut at Tanglewood in July 2012, sharing a program with his father, conductor Kurt Masur. He became a BSO assistant conductor in fall 2014. Previous appointments include associate conductor of the San Diego Symphony, assistant conductor of the Orchestre National de France, and resident conductor of the San Antonio Symphony. He has had guest engagements with the Dresden, Israel, and Japan Philharmonics; with the Orchestre National de Toulouse, and the Hiroshima, Omaha, and Memphis symphonies. Ken-David Masur has recently made recordings with the English Chamber Orchestra and violinist Fanny Clamagirand, as well as with the Stavanger Symphony. As founding music director of the Bach Society Orchestra and Chorus at Columbia University, he toured Germany and released a critically acclaimed album of symphonies and cantatas by W.F. Bach, C.P.E. Bach and J.S. Bach. Masur received a Grammy nomination from the Latin Recording Academy in the category Best Classical Album of the Year for his work as a producer of the album "Salon Buenos Aires."

Ken-David Masur, conductor Cynthia Meyers, piccolo
Cynthia Meyers, piccolo View biography in full page >

Cynthia Meyers joined the Boston Symphony Orchestra as its piccolo player in the autumn of 2006, occupying the Evelyn and C. Charles Marran Chair. Before coming to Boston she served as principal piccolo of the Houston Symphony for nine years under the direction of Christoph Eschenbach and Hans Graf. She is the former principal flutist of the Omaha Symphony, a post she held for nine seasons, during which time she was a featured soloist with the orchestra on numerous occasions. A native of Somerset, Pennsylvania, Ms. Meyers began playing the piano at age three. Currently a faculty member at the New England Conservatory of Music, she earned her bachelor of fine arts degree at Carnegie Mellon University and completed her master of music degree at the Cleveland Institute of Music as a student of Jeffrey Khaner, principal flutist of the Philadelphia Orchestra. She took an interest in playing the piccolo while in Cleveland and continued study specifically on that instrument with William Hebert of the Cleveland Orchestra. Besides playing with the BSO, Ms. Meyers has performed with the Minnesota Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, and at the Grand Teton Music Festival.

Cynthia Meyers, piccolo
William R. Hudgins, clarinet
William R. Hudgins, clarinet View biography in full page >

William R. Hudgins was appointed principal clarinetist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra by Seiji Ozawa in 1994, occupying the Ann S.M. Banks chair, having joined the orchestra two years earlier. He has been heard as a soloist with the BSO on numerous occasions, including performances of Mozart's Clarinet Concerto, Copland's Clarinet Concerto, Bruch's Double Concerto for Clarinet and Viola, Frank Martin's Concerto for Seven Winds, Timpani, Percussion, and String Orchestra, and, for the opening of the BSO's 2014-15 season, Mozart's Sinfonia concertante in E-flat, K.297b. As a member of the Boston Symphony Chamber Players, he can be heard on their BSO Classics CDs of Brahms and Dvořák serenades (the ensemble's most recent release); the Grammy-nominated "Profanes et Sacrées: 20th-Century French Chamber Music"; "Plain Song, Fantastic Dances" (in music of Gandolfi, Foss, and Golijov), and the Grammy-nominated "Mozart Chamber Music for Strings and Winds" (in Mozart's Quintet for Clarinet and Strings, K.581), as well as a Grammy-nominated Arabesque recording of Hindemith's Quartet for Clarinet, Violin, Cello, and Piano. Recent appearances outside of the Boston Symphony Orchestra include orchestral performances and recordings with the Saito Kinen Orchestra in Matsumoto, Japan, and the Mito Chamber Orchestra in Mito, Japan, both under the direction of Seiji Ozawa; chamber music at the Rockport Chamber Music Festival, and recitals and master classes at various universities and around the United States. Before joining the BSO, Mr. Hudgins served as principal clarinetist and soloist with the Orquesta Sinfonica Municipal in Caracas, Venezuela, and the Charleston Symphony Orchestra in South Carolina. He was heard for six seasons as a member of both the Spoleto Festival Orchestra in Charleston, South Carolina, and Il Festival dei Due Mondi in Spoleto, Italy. He also participated as a Fellow of the Tanglewood Music Center, where he won the C.D. Jackson Award for outstanding performance. Mr. Hudgins received his bachelor's degree from the Boston University School for the Arts, studying with former BSO principal clarinetist Harold Wright.

 

 

Visit bostonsymphonychamberplayers.org for more information about the Boston Symphony Chamber Players.

William R. Hudgins, clarinet Michael Wayne, clarinet
Michael Wayne, clarinet View biography in full page >

Clarinetist Michael Wayne joined the Boston Symphony Orchestra's clarinet section in September 2008. Prior to joining the BSO, Mr. Wayne was Principal Clarinet of the Kansas City Symphony and a member of the Grand Teton Festival Orchestra. He is on the faculty of the New England Conservatory of Music and the Tanglewood Music Center and has been a visiting professor at the Oberlin Conservatory of Music. He has given master classes across the country, including the Manhattan School of Music, University of Michigan, and New World Symphony. Mr. Wayne made his Carnegie Hall solo debut with the world premiere of Michael Daugherty's clarinet concerto, Brooklyn Bridge, and subsequently recorded it for Equilibrium Records. Festival performances include Verbier, Music Academy of the West, NOI, and Hot Springs. He has been the recipient of the Paul Boylan Award (University of Michigan), Whitaker Advanced Study Grant (Music Academy of the West), Earl V. Moore Award (University of Michigan), and a Fine Arts Award (Interlochen). He holds degrees from the Interlochen Arts Academy and the University of Michigan, where his principal teachers were Richard Hawkins and Fred Ormand.

Michael Wayne, clarinet
Thomas Rolfs, trumpet
Thomas Rolfs, trumpet View biography in full page >

Thomas Rolfs, Principal Trumpet of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Boston Pops, began his career with the BSO in 1991 under Seiji Ozawa. He served first as 4th trumpet, and was later promoted by Ozawa to Associate Principal Trumpet. He was promoted to Principal Trumpet by James Levine. As a student, Mr. Rolfs was a Tanglewood Music Center Fellow in 1978, earned his bachelor of music degree from the University of Minnesota, and received his master of music degree from Northwestern University. He returned to Minnesota for a five-year tenure with the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra. As a soloist, Rolfs has performed with the Boston Symphony and Boston Pops orchestras and the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, as well as performing the posthorn solo in Mahler's Symphony No. 3 with the Dallas Symphony. At the request of John Williams, he was a featured soloist on the composer's Grammy-nominated soundtrack for the Academy Award-winning film Saving Private Ryan. He was also soloist in Williams's Summon the Heroes for the nationally televised Boston Pops concert on the Esplanade on July 4, 2001, under Keith Lockhart's direction. His varied performance background also includes appearances withthe National Brass Ensemble, Minnesota Orchestra, Vienna Philharmonic, Empire Brass, Saint Petersburg Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony, Lyric Opera of Chicago, and the American Ballet Orchestra. Rolfs is a founding member of the Boston Symphony Orchestra Brass Quintet, which is in residence at Boston University. As an educator, Rolfs has presented masterclasses throughout the world, including North America, South America, Asia, and Europe. He has served on the faculty of the Tanglewood Music Center since 1998, regularly coaches the New World Symphony, and teaches at both the New England Conservatory and Boston University.

Thomas Rolfs, trumpet Toby Oft, trombone
Toby Oft, trombone View biography in full page >

Toby Oft is the twelfth principal trombone in the history of the Boston Symphony Orchestra; occupying the J.P. and Mary B. Barger Chair, he was appointed in 2008 by then music director James Levine. Currently in his ninth season with the BSO, he has performed both as a soloist with the orchestra and as a chamber musician with the Boston Symphony Chamber Players. Mr. Oft previously held principal trombone positions with the San Diego Symphony, Buffalo Philharmonic, and Sarasota Orchestra. International career highlights as a concerto soloist have included acclaimed performances of such works as Launy Grøndahl's Concerto for Trombone and Ferdinand David's Concertino for Trombone with a diverse variety of ensembles on several continents. Domestic solo performances range from Gunther Schuller's virtuosic Eine Kleine Posaunenmusik with "Pershing's Own" U.S. Army Band in Washington, D.C., to Leopold Mozart's rarely performed Serenade in D for trumpet, alto trombone, and orchestra with the Boston Classical Orchestra. Deeply committed to education, Mr. Oft has presented master classes and recitals around the world. Here at home, he is on the faculty at the New England Conservatory and Boston University. During the summer, he coaches at the Tanglewood Music Center and is a frequent guest teacher and performer at the Boston University Tanglewood Institute. In addition to prominent military band and teaching positions, Mr. Oft's students have won tenured positions in top orchestras such as Detroit, Jacksonville, Toronto, and Puerto Rico. Recent students have also been accepted to such distinguished festivals as the Verbier Festival and Tanglewood Music Center. As an Edwards Instruments performing artist, Mr. Oft helped design the new T350-HB tenor trombone model and has his own exclusive line of tenor and alto trombone mouthpieces with Griego Mouthpieces. In spring 2014, Toby Oft released his debut album, "First Look." As part of the lineage of the great Joannes Rochut, a former principal trombone of the BSO, he is currently recording all the Rochut Etudes in HD video for YouTube students worldwide. For links to these videos and more, please visit TobyOft.com.

Toby Oft, trombone
James Sommerville, horn
James Sommerville, horn View biography in full page >

James Sommerville became principal horn of the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 1998, occupying the Helen Sagoff Slosberg/Edna S. Kalman Chair. As principal horn, he is also a member of the Boston Symphony Chamber Players. Mr. Sommerville is also music director of the Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra. Winner of the highest prizes at the Munich, Toulon, and CBC competitions, he has pursued a solo career spanning thirty years and has made critically acclaimed appearances with major orchestras throughout North America and Europe. His disc of the Mozart horn concertos with the CBC Vancouver Orchestra won the JUNO Award for Best Classical Recording in Canada. Other award-winning CBC recordings include Britten's Serenade for Tenor, Horn, and Strings and Britten's Canticle. He has recorded chamber music for Deutsche Grammophon, Telarc, CBC, Summit, Marquis, and BSO Classics. Mr. Sommerville has been a member of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, the Montreal Symphony Orchestra, the Canadian Opera Company Orchestra, and Symphony Nova Scotia, and was acting solo horn of the Chamber Orchestra of Europe. He has toured and recorded extensively as an orchestral player, is heard regularly on the CBC network, and has recorded all of the standard solo horn repertoire for broadcast. As a guest artist and faculty member, he has performed at chamber music festivals worldwide. Solo performances have included the world premiere of Christos Hatzis's Winter Solstice; the North American premiere of Ligeti's Hamburg Concerto with the BSO; John Williams's Horn Concerto; the world premiere of Elliott Carter's Horn Concerto, commissioned for him by the BSO; and the world premiere of Osvaldo Golijov's Sign of the Leviathan, a TMC 75th-anniversary commission, with the Tanglewood Music Center Orchestra. Mr. Sommerville has himself commissioned and premiered a great deal of music by young composers, including works ranging from solo horn to full orchestra. Other solo appearances with the BSO have included Richard Strauss's Horn Concerto No. 1, Britten's Serenade for Tenor, Horn, and Strings, Frank Martin's Concerto for Seven Wind Instruments, Timpani, Percussion, and String Orchestra, Mozart's Horn Concertos 1 and 2 (the latter on forty-eight hours' notice with Bernard Haitink conducting), Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 1, and Mozart's Sinfonia concertante in E-flat for winds, K.297b. As a conductor, Mr. Sommerville has appeared with many professional orchestras and ensembles throughout Canada and the U.S.

 

 

Visit bostonsymphonychamberplayers.org for more information about the Boston Symphony Chamber Players.

James Sommerville, horn Michael Winter, horn
Michael Winter, horn View biography in full page >

Michael Winter joined the Boston Symphony Orchestra as third horn in September 2012, occupying the Elizabeth B. Storer Chair. Prior to his appointment with the BSO, he was acting principal horn of the Buffalo Philharmonic and principal horn of the Syracuse Symphony Orchestra for several seasons. He has also performed as guest principal horn with the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra and Los Angeles Philharmonic. Mr. Winter was born in Southern California and raised there by a musical family. He began his horn studies with his grandfather, the respected horn teacher Dr. James Winter, and later studied with Jim Thatcher and John Mason. He then moved to Boston to pursue a degree at the New England Conservatory of Music, where he worked with BSO members Richard Mackey and Richard Sebring. He is currently on the faculty of the New England Conservatory of Music.

Michael Winter, horn
Rachel Childers, horn
Rachel Childers, horn View biography in full page >

Rachel Childers joined the Boston Symphony Orchestra as second horn at the start of the 2011-12 season, becoming the first female member of the BSO brass section in its history; she occupies the John P. II and Nancy S. Eustis Chair in the BSO's horn section. Ms. Childers received both her bachelor's and master's degrees in music from the University of Michigan, followed by an Artist Diploma from the Colburn School in Los Angeles. She is on the faculty at the New England Conservatory of Music.

Rachel Childers, horn Jason Snider, horn
Jason Snider, horn View biography in full page >

Jason Snider joined the Boston Symphony Orchestra and Boston Pops as fourth horn in 2007. Prior to that he held positions as second horn with Lyric Opera of Chicago and associate principal horn of the San Antonio Symphony. A native of Arkansas, Mr. Snider attended Northwestern University and performed with the Civic Orchestra of Chicago for two seasons. After graduating with honors, he earned his graduate degree at Rice University. Mr. Snider has performed with the Chicago and Houston symphony orchestras, Houston Grand Opera, the Chicago Chamber Musicians, the Boston Chamber Music Society, and Collage New Music. He has also played with such varied music festivals as Sun Valley, Grant Park, the Grand Tetons, the National Repertory Orchestra, the Pacific Music Festival in Japan, the Jerusalem International Symphony, and the Orquesta Sinfónica de Mineria in Mexico City. Currently on faculty at the New England Conservatory and Boston University, Mr. Snider teaches and performs regularly in recitals and master classes.

 

Jason Snider, horn
Program Notes Audio
VIVALDI - Piccolo Concerto in C, RV 443 (12 min)
JOLIVET - Concertino for trumpet, piano and strings (9 min)
KROMMER - Concerto No. 2 for two clarinets and orchestra, Op. 91 (20 min)
ROTA - Trombone Concerto (13 min)
SCHUMANN - Conzertstück (“Concert Piece”) for four horns and orchestra (18 min)
Full Program Notes - Audio Concert Preview
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