Tickets & Events

Boston Symphony Chamber Players with soprano Yulia Van Doren and pianist Paul Lewis

Tanglewood

Seiji Ozawa Hall - Lenox, MA View Map

The Boston Symphony Chamber Players make their annual Tanglewood appearance on Wednesday, August 16. Opening the program is Sofia Gubaidulina's Garden of Joys and Sorrows, for flute, viola, and harp, a one-movement piece inspired by Eastern storyteller Iv Oganov's "Sayat-Nova" and verses by 20th-century German poet Francisco Tanzer. The program also features soprano Yulia Van Doren in Bach's Cantata No. 199, Mein Herze schwimmt im Blut, and pianist Paul Lewis in Dvořák's Quintet in A for piano and strings, Op. 81. 

Featured Performers & Ensembles

Yulia Van Doren, soprano
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Consistently singled out by critics for her "perfect baroque voice" (Seattle Times), young Russian-American soprano Yulia Van Doren has established herself as a rising star of the new generation of Baroque specialists. Of her performance of Handel arias with conductor Nicholas McGegan, Northwest Reverb wrote, "It was immediately obvious why she is so highly regarded despite her relative youth: she sang in a dizzyingly intricate coloratura, flawless in timbre while executing rapid, difficult ornamentation with pinpoint accuracy, despite the merciless tempo." The only singer to win top prizes in all four North American Bach vocal competitions, she has been invited to make her debut solo recording with the American Bach Soloists this season, which will feature an eclectic program of Bach, Harbison and Britten.

Ms. Van Doren's extensive upcoming debuts include a tour to the Mostly Mozart, Ravinia, and Tanglewood festivals with the Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra as Dorinda in Handel's Orlando, Galatea in Handel's Acis and Galatea at China's Macau International Music Festival with the Akademie für alte Musik Berlin, Mereo in Scarlatti's Tigrane with Opéra de Nice, Betsy in the modern revival of Monsigny's Le Roi et le Fermier with Opera Lafayette (a production that tours to the Kennedy Center, Lincoln Center, Opéra Royal de Versailles and will be recorded for Naxos), St. Theresa in Thomson's Four Saints in Three Acts with the Mark Morris Dance Group at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, Messiah with both the Houston Symphony and the Vancouver Chamber Choir, chamber music concerts with Folger Consort, Nielsen's Symphony No. 3 with the American Symphony Orchestra, and Bach's B Minor Mass with Music of the Baroque under Jane Glover and her debut with the Nashville Symphony in 2013. A winner of Astral Artists' 2009 National Auditions, she makes her Philadelphia recital debut in January 2012 on Astral's concert series.

Beginning her professional career while still an undergraduate at the New England Conservatory, Ms. Van Doren has already appeared as a soloist with the majority of the North American baroque festivals and orchestras, and is featured on several Grammy-nominated opera recordings with the Boston Early Music Festival. She appears regularly as Belinda with Mark Morris Dance Group's iconic production of Dido and Aeneas, including recent performances in Moscow's Golden Mask Festival and upcoming performances with the Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, featuring mezzo superstar Stephanie Blythe as Dido. Ms. Van Doren was a featured artist of the 2011 Cartagena International Music Festival, performing Bach's Coffee Cantata with the Brentano String Quartet and nationally-televised performances of Bach's B minor Mass with soprano Dawn Upshaw and the City of London Sinfonia. Upshaw is an important mentor: Ms. Van Doren was personally invited by the legendary soprano to be a member of the inaugural class of Upshaw's graduate program at Bard College, from which she received her Master's degree in 2008.

Her musical interests expand far beyond the baroque repertoire: In recent seasons Ms. Van Doren has also debuted with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, Colorado Symphony, Phoenix Symphony, Asheville Symphony, Pacific Symphony and Colorado Music Festival. Particularly passionate about 20th- and 21st-century music, Ms. Van Doren recently sang the Hungarian première of Barber's Knoxville: Summer of 1915 with the Hungarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, marking her European debut. She made her Carnegie Hall debut premièring a specially commissioned work by Taiwanese composer Angel Lam, and created the role of Bird in British composer David Bruce's opera A Bird In Your Ear at Bard Conservatory, which was also showcased at New York City Opera's VOX Festival.

Born in Moscow and raised in the United States, Ms. Van Doren has been a fellow at the Tanglewood Music Festival and Villecroze Académie (France). She has been the recipient of numerous academic scholarships, including the prestigious Soros Fellowship for New Americans. As the recipient of a Frank Huntington Beebe Grant for Advanced European Study, she will be based in Paris for the 2011-2012 season, pursuing a course of private study and European career development.

Visit Yulia on the web at www.yuliavandoren.com.

Yulia Van Doren, soprano Paul Lewis, piano
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Paul Lewis is internationally regarded as one of the leading musicians of his generation. His cycles of core piano works by Beethoven and Schubert have received unanimous critical and public acclaim worldwide, and consolidated his reputation as one of the world’s foremost interpreters of the central European classical repertoire. His numerous awards have included the Royal Philharmonic Society’s Instrumentalist of the Year, two Edison awards, three Gramophone awards, the Diapason D'or de l'Annee, the Preis Der Deutschen Schallplattenkritik, the Premio Internazionale Accademia Musicale Chigiana, and the South Bank Show Classical Music award. He holds honorary degrees from Liverpool, Edge Hill, and Southampton Universities, and was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in the 2016 Queen's Birthday Honours.

He appears regularly as soloist with the world's great orchestras, including the Boston Symphony, Chicago Symphony, London Symphony, London Philharmonic, Bavarian Radio Symphony, NHK Symphony, New York Philharmonic, LA Philharmonic, and the Royal Concertgebouw, Cleveland, Tonhalle Zurich, Leipzig Gewandhaus, Philharmonia, and Mahler Chamber Orchestras.

The 16/17 season included Beethoven concerto cycles with Melbourne Symphony Orchestra, the São Paulo State Symphony Orchestra, and the Royal Flemish Philharmonic Orchestra, appearances with the Orchestre de Paris and Daniel Harding, the Philharmonia with Andris Nelsons, Chicago Symphony with Manfred Honeck, and the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra with Bernard Haitink. The 18/19 season sees the continuation of a two year recital series exploring connections between the sonatas of Haydn, the late piano works of Brahms, and Beethoven's Bagatelles and Diabelli Variations.

Paul Lewis’ recital career takes him to venues such as London's Royal Festival Hall, Alice Tully and Carnegie Hall in New York, the Musikverein and Konzerthaus in Vienna, the Theatre des Champs Elysees in Paris, the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, and the Berlin Philharmonie and Konzerthaus. He is also a frequent guest at the some of the world's most prestigious festivals, including Tanglewood, Ravinia, Schubertiade, Edinburgh, Salzburg, Lucerne, and the BBC Proms where in 2010 he became the first person to play a complete Beethoven piano concerto cycle in a single season.

His multi-award winning discography for Harmonia Mundi includes the complete Beethoven piano sonatas, concertos, and the Diabelli Variations, Liszt’s B minor Sonata and other late works, all of Schubert’s major piano works from the last six years of his life including the 3 song cycles with tenor Mark Padmore, solo works by Schumann and Mussorgsky, and the Brahms D minor piano concerto with the Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra and Daniel Harding. Future recording plans include a multi-CD series of Haydn sonatas, Beethoven's Bagatelles, and works by Bach.

Paul Lewis studied with Joan Havill at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London before going on to study privately with Alfred Brendel. He is co-Artistic Director of Midsummer Music, an annual chamber music festival held in Buckinghamshire, UK, and the Leeds International Piano Competition.

 

Paul Lewis, piano
Boston Symphony Chamber Players
Malcolm Lowe
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Malcolm Lowe joined the Boston Symphony Orchestra as concertmaster in 1984, becoming the tenth concertmaster in the orchestra's history and only its third since 1920. As concertmaster, he also performs with the Boston Symphony Chamber Players. Mr. Lowe is equally at home as an orchestral player, chamber musician, solo recitalist, and teacher. He appears frequently as a soloist with the Boston Symphony Orchestra at Symphony Hall and Tanglewood and he has returned many times to his native Canada for guest appearances as a soloist with the Toronto and Montreal Symphony Orchestras and the National Arts Centre Orchestra in Ottawa.

Mr. Lowe is a faculty member at the Tanglewood Music Center, New England Conservatory, and Boston University. Prior to his Boston appointment, he was concertmaster of the Quebec Symphony Orchestra. The recipient of many awards, he was one of the top laureate winners in the 1979 Montreal International Violin Competition. Born to musical parents - his father was a violinist and his mother a vocalist - on a farm in Hamiota, Manitoba, Mr. Lowe moved with his family to Regina, Saskatchewan at the age of nine. There he studied at the Regina Conservatory of Music with Howard Leyton-Brown, former concertmaster of the London Philharmonic. He later studied with Ivan Galamian at the Meadowmount School of Music and at the Curtis Institute of Music. Mr. Lowe also studied violin with Sally Thomas and Jaime Laredo and was greatly influenced by Josef Gingold, Felix Galimir, Alexander Schneider, and Jascha Brodsky.

 

Visit bostonsymphonychamberplayers.org for more information about the Boston Symphony Chamber Players.

Haldan Martinson
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Haldan Martinson made his solo debut with the Los Angeles Philharmonic in 1990 and made his national television debut in 1988 performing on Johnny Carson's Tonight Show. Mr. Martinson has soloed with many other orchestras, including the Waterloo-Cedar Falls Symphony Orchestra, the Metamorphosen Chamber Orchestra and the Yale Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Martinson is the recipient of numerous prizes, scholarships, and awards including the Spotlight Award of the Los Angeles Music Center. He has participated in the chamber music festivals of Ravinia, Taos, Santa Fe, and La Jolla. From 1996 to 1998 he was a member of the Metamorphosen Chamber Ensemble.

Mr. Martinson graduated with a B.A. in Music from Yale College (1994), where he was awarded the Louis Sudler Prize, one of the most prestigious awards granted by the university. He was concertmaster of the Yale Symphony Orchestra from 1991 to 1994. Mr. Martinson received a Master of Music degree from New England Conservatory (1997). His former teachers have included Robert Lipsett, Endré Granat, David Nadien, Aaron Rosand, and James Buswell.

Mr. Martinson is also a prize-winning composer whose works for string ensemble have been featured frequently in concert. One of Mr. Martinson's works, Dance of the Trolls for string orchestra, was commissioned by the Crossroads Chamber Orchestra in 1988 and has been performed throughout Southern California.

As principal second violin of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Mr. Martinson is also a member of the Boston Symphony Chamber Players. He joined the orchestra as a section violinist in November 1998 and was appointed to his current position in the summer of 2000. From 1998-2002 he was a member of the critically acclaimed Hawthorne String Quartet.

 

Visit bostonsymphonychamberplayers.org for more information about the Boston Symphony Chamber Players.

Steven Ansell
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Steven Ansell joined the Boston Symphony Orchestra as principal viola in September 1996, occupying the Charles S. Dana chair, having already appeared with the BSO in Symphony Hall as guest principal viola. A native of Seattle, he also remains a member of the acclaimed Muir String Quartet, which he co-founded in 1979, and with which he has toured extensively throughout the world. A graduate of the Curtis Institute of Music, where he studied with Michael Tree and Karen Tuttle, Mr. Ansell was named professor of viola at the University of Houston at twenty-one and became assistant principal viola of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra under André Previn at twenty-three. As a recording artist he has received two Grand Prix du Disque awards and a Gramophone magazine award for Best Chamber Music Recording of the Year. He has appeared on PBS's "In Performance at the White House," has participated in the Tanglewood, Marlboro, Schleswig-Holstein, Newport, Blossom, Spoleto, and Snowbird music festivals, and premiered Ezra Laderman's Concerto for Viola and Orchestra with the Berkshires Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Ansell teaches at the Boston University College of Fine Arts. As principal viola of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, he is also a member of the Boston Symphony Chamber Players.  

 

Visit bostonsymphonychamberplayers.org for more information about the Boston Symphony Chamber Players.

Edwin Barker
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BSO principal bass Edwin Barker has concertized in North America, Europe, and the Far East. He has performed and recorded with the BSO, the Boston Symphony Chamber Players, and the contemporary music ensemble Collage, and is a frequent guest performer with the Boston Chamber Music Society. Mr. Barker gave the world premieres of James Yannatos' Concerto for Contrabass and Chamber Orchestra (which was written especially for him) and of Theodore Antoniou's Concertino for Contrabass and Chamber Orchestra; he was the featured soloist in the New England premiere of Gunther Schuller's Concerto for Double Bass and Chamber Orchestra. Mr. Barker graduated with honors in 1976 from the New England Conservatory, where he studied double bass with Henry Portnoi. That same year, at age twenty-two, while a member of the Chicago Symphony, he was appointed principal double bass of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. His other double bass teachers included Peter Mercurio, Richard Stephan, Angelo LaMariana, and David Perleman. Mr. Barker inaugurated the BSO's 100th Anniversary Season with performances of Koussevitzky's Bass Concerto; other solo engagements have included appearances at Seiji Ozawa Hall, Carnegie Recital Hall, and major universities and conferences throughout the world, as well as concerto performances with the Boston Classical Orchestra and the Boston Symphony Orchestra in Boston and Europe. In July 1995 he was chosen by the late Sir Georg Solti to lead the bass section of the United Nations' "Musicians of the World," an orchestra made up of prominent musicians from the world's finest orchestras. Mr. Barker is an associate professor at the Boston University College of Fine Arts, where he teaches double bass, orchestral techniques, and chamber music. His other major teaching affiliations include the BSO's Tanglewood Music Center, where he is Chairman of Instrumental and Orchestral Studies, and the National Orchestral Institute at the University of Maryland. His solo CDs include "Three Sonatas for Double Bass"; James Yannatos' Variations for Solo Contrabass, and the recently released "Concerti for Double Bass," which includes concertos by Gunther Schuller and Theodore Antoniou.

 

Visit bostonsymphonychamberplayers.org for more information about the Boston Symphony Chamber Players.

Elizabeth Rowe
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BSO principal flutist Elizabeth Rowe joined the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 2004 and holds the Walter Piston Principal Flute Chair. Prior to joining the BSO, Ms. Rowe held titled positions with the orchestras of Fort Wayne, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C. Regularly featured in front of the orchestra, she has been soloist with the BSO in Elliott Carter's Flute Concerto (including its American premiere performances under James Levine in February 2010, followed by later performances in Boston and San Francisco); the Ligeti Double Concerto for flute and oboe with Christoph von Dohnányi conducting and BSO principal oboe John Ferrillo; Gabriela Lena Frank's Illapa, Tone Poem for Flute and Orchestra, with Miguel Harth-Bedoya conducting; Mozart's G major flute concerto, K.313, with which she made her first BSO appearance as a concerto soloist in August 2008, under André Previn's direction at Tanglewood; Frank Martin's Concerto for Seven Wind Instruments, Timpani, Percussion, and Strings in October 2012; Bach's Brandenburg Concertos Nos. 5 and 2 at Tanglewood in 2012 and 2013, respectively; Mozart's C major concerto for flute and harp in 2016 in Boston and at Tanglewood, with BSO principal harp Jessica Zhou; and, most recently, Leonard Bernstein's Ḥalil in September 2017, in the BSO's season-opening all-Bernstein program with Andris Nelsons conducting. In November 2017, she and Ms. Zhou perform Mozart's Concerto for Flute and Harp with Andris Nelsons and the BSO during the orchestra's tour that month to Japan. Noted for her insightful teaching, Ms. Rowe attracts flute students from around the country to her lessons and master classes. She works regularly with students at the New England Conservatory and the Tanglewood Music Center and is a frequent guest artist at the New World Symphony. She previously taught at the Peabody Conservatory of Music and University of Maryland. A member of the Boston Symphony Chamber Players, she can be heard in a wide variety of chamber works throughout the season at NEC's Jordan Hall and in several recordings. Elizabeth Rowe grew up in Eugene, Oregon. She received her bachelor of music degree from the University of Southern California, where she was a Trustee Scholar and a student of Jim Walker, former principal flute of the Los Angeles Philharmonic. Ms. Rowe's connection to the Boston Symphony Orchestra dates back to the summer of 1996, when she was a Tanglewood Music Center Fellow and performed as principal flute under Seiji Ozawa's direction in the TMC production of Benjamin Britten's Peter Grimes that marked the fiftieth anniversary of the opera's 1946 American premiere at Tanglewood.

John Ferrillo
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John Ferrillo joined the Boston Symphony Orchestra as principal oboe at the start of the 2001 Tanglewood season, having appeared with the orchestra several times as a guest performer in previous seasons. From 1986 to 2001 he was principal oboe of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra. Mr. Ferrillo grew up in Bedford, Massachusetts, and played in the Greater Boston Youth Symphony Orchestra. He is a graduate of the Curtis Institute, where he studied with John deLancie and received his diploma and Artist's certificate. He also studied with John Mack at the Blossom Festival and has   participated in the Marlboro, Craftsbury, and Monadnock festivals. Prior to his appointment at the Metropolitan Opera, Mr. Ferrillo was second oboe of the San Francisco Symphony, and was a faculty member at Illinois State University and West Virginia State University. A former  faculty member of the Mannes School of Music and Juilliard School of Music in New York City, he has taught and performed at the Aspen and Waterloo festivals and currently serves on the faculty of the New England Conservatory, Boston University, and the Boston University Tanglewood Institute.

 

Visit bostonsymphonychamberplayers.org for more information about the Boston Symphony Chamber Players.

William R. Hudgins
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William R. Hudgins was appointed principal clarinetist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra by Seiji Ozawa in 1994, occupying the Ann S.M. Banks chair, having joined the orchestra two years earlier. He has been heard as a soloist with the BSO on numerous occasions, including performances of Mozart's Clarinet Concerto, Copland's Clarinet Concerto, Bruch's Double Concerto for Clarinet and Viola, Frank Martin's Concerto for Seven Winds, Timpani, Percussion, and String Orchestra, and, for the opening of the BSO's 2014-15 season, Mozart's Sinfonia concertante in E-flat, K.297b. As a member of the Boston Symphony Chamber Players, he can be heard on their BSO Classics CDs of Brahms and Dvořák serenades (the ensemble's most recent release); the Grammy-nominated "Profanes et Sacrées: 20th-Century French Chamber Music"; "Plain Song, Fantastic Dances" (in music of Gandolfi, Foss, and Golijov), and the Grammy-nominated "Mozart Chamber Music for Strings and Winds" (in Mozart's Quintet for Clarinet and Strings, K.581), as well as a Grammy-nominated Arabesque recording of Hindemith's Quartet for Clarinet, Violin, Cello, and Piano. Recent appearances outside of the Boston Symphony Orchestra include orchestral performances and recordings with the Saito Kinen Orchestra in Matsumoto, Japan, and the Mito Chamber Orchestra in Mito, Japan, both under the direction of Seiji Ozawa; chamber music at the Rockport Chamber Music Festival, and recitals and master classes at various universities and around the United States. Before joining the BSO, Mr. Hudgins served as principal clarinetist and soloist with the Orquesta Sinfonica Municipal in Caracas, Venezuela, and the Charleston Symphony Orchestra in South Carolina. He was heard for six seasons as a member of both the Spoleto Festival Orchestra in Charleston, South Carolina, and Il Festival dei Due Mondi in Spoleto, Italy. He also participated as a Fellow of the Tanglewood Music Center, where he won the C.D. Jackson Award for outstanding performance. Mr. Hudgins received his bachelor's degree from the Boston University School for the Arts, studying with former BSO principal clarinetist Harold Wright.

 

 

Visit bostonsymphonychamberplayers.org for more information about the Boston Symphony Chamber Players.

Richard Svoboda
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Richard Svoboda has been the principal bassoonist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and a member of the Boston Symphony Chamber Players since 1989; as the BSO's principal bassoon he occupies the Edward A. Taft Chair, endowed in perpetuity. Mr. Svoboda is currently on the faculties of the New England Conservatory of Music, the Tanglewood Music Center, and the Sarasota Music Festival, and has given master classes throughout the world. Prior to his BSO appointment, he performed for ten seasons as principal bassoonist of the Jacksonville Symphony.

Mr. Svoboda is an active chamber music collaborator, orchestral soloist, and recitalist. Among his solo appearances with the Boston Symphony Orchestra have been performances of John Williams's bassoon concerto Five Sacred Trees with the composer conducting and Weber's Concerto for Bassoon under the baton of Seiji Ozawa. In November 2013 he is soloist in the world premiere of Marc Neikrug's BSO-commissioned Concerto for Bassoon and Orchestra with R afael Frühbeck de Burgos on the podium. In 2007 he premiered Michael Gandolfi's Concerto for Bassoon, and in 2011, along with his daughter, clarinetist Erin Svoboda, he premiered Gandolfi's Concerto for Clarinet and Bassoon, both times collaborating with Yoichi Udagawa and the Melrose Symphony Orchestra.

Richard Svoboda has to his credit over thirty recordings with the Boston Symphony Orchestra and Boston Symphony Chamber Players, as well as the soundtracks to Schindler's List and Saving Private Ryan. His recording of Michael Gandolfi's Concerto for Bassoon with Gil Rose and the Boston Modern Orchestra Project was a May 2013 release, and two CDs of solo bassoon repertoire are in various stages of completion. "Le Phénix, 18th-Century French Music for Bassoon," including music of Boismortier, Corrette, and Devienne, was released in November 2013, and a CD of early 20th-century European music is in the editing stage.

Mr. Svoboda is married and is the extremely proud father of four daughters. He and his family reside in Melrose. For further information, please visit RichardSvoboda.com.

James Sommerville
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James Sommerville became principal horn of the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 1998, occupying the Helen Sagoff Slosberg/Edna S. Kalman Chair. As principal horn, he is also a member of the Boston Symphony Chamber Players. Mr. Sommerville is also music director of the Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra. Winner of the highest prizes at the Munich, Toulon, and CBC competitions, he has pursued a solo career spanning thirty years and has made critically acclaimed appearances with major orchestras throughout North America and Europe. His disc of the Mozart horn concertos with the CBC Vancouver Orchestra won the JUNO Award for Best Classical Recording in Canada. Other award-winning CBC recordings include Britten's Serenade for Tenor, Horn, and Strings and Britten's Canticle. He has recorded chamber music for Deutsche Grammophon, Telarc, CBC, Summit, Marquis, and BSO Classics. Mr. Sommerville has been a member of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, the Montreal Symphony Orchestra, the Canadian Opera Company Orchestra, and Symphony Nova Scotia, and was acting solo horn of the Chamber Orchestra of Europe. He has toured and recorded extensively as an orchestral player, is heard regularly on the CBC network, and has recorded all of the standard solo horn repertoire for broadcast. As a guest artist and faculty member, he has performed at chamber music festivals worldwide. Solo performances have included the world premiere of Christos Hatzis's Winter Solstice; the North American premiere of Ligeti's Hamburg Concerto with the BSO; John Williams's Horn Concerto; the world premiere of Elliott Carter's Horn Concerto, commissioned for him by the BSO; and the world premiere of Osvaldo Golijov's Sign of the Leviathan, a TMC 75th-anniversary commission, with the Tanglewood Music Center Orchestra. Mr. Sommerville has himself commissioned and premiered a great deal of music by young composers, including works ranging from solo horn to full orchestra. Other solo appearances with the BSO have included Richard Strauss's Horn Concerto No. 1, Britten's Serenade for Tenor, Horn, and Strings, Frank Martin's Concerto for Seven Wind Instruments, Timpani, Percussion, and String Orchestra, Mozart's Horn Concertos 1 and 2 (the latter on forty-eight hours' notice with Bernard Haitink conducting), Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 1, and Mozart's Sinfonia concertante in E-flat for winds, K.297b. As a conductor, Mr. Sommerville has appeared with many professional orchestras and ensembles throughout Canada and the U.S.

 

 

Visit bostonsymphonychamberplayers.org for more information about the Boston Symphony Chamber Players.

Program Notes Audio
Sofia GUBAIDULINA - Garden of Joy and Sorrow, for flute, viola, and harp (15 min)
J.S. BACH - Cantata No. 199, Mein Herze schwimmt im Blut (25 min)
DVOŘÁK - Quintet in A for piano and strings, Op. 81 (38 min)