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The 2021-2022 BSO Season

Boston Symphony Orchestra 2021-22 Season Programs

The Boston Symphony Orchestra and Music Director Andris Nelsons present a 2021-22 Symphony Hall season, September 30-April 30, that will first and foremost celebrate reuniting with our music community post-pandemic, while also continuing the orchestra’s commitment to welcoming new audiences to experience the singular gifts the BSO and Mr. Nelsons are so eager to share with devoted listeners in Boston and throughout the world. This commitment to returning to performances with audiences is matched by an equally strong commitment to the health and safety of everyone associated with the BSO, including patrons, staff, and musicians.

In celebration of the reopening of Symphony Hall, the BSO will present a free community concert under the direction of Andris Nelsons, Keith Lockhart, Thomas Wilkins, and John Williams on October 3.

  • Andris Nelsons and John Williams conduct Beethoven, John Williams and Bartók featuring Anne-Sophie Mutter, violin

    Led by both Music Director Andris Nelsons and Boston Pops Conductor Laureate John Williams, the BSO presents a special pair of concerts to welcome back live audiences to Symphony Hall after a nearly 20-month absence. Opening the concert, Mr. Nelsons leads Beethoven’s Consecration of the House Overture, the first work ever performed by the BSO in 1881. Mr. Williams then takes the podium for the first Boston performances of his own Violin Concerto No. 2, written for superstar violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter, which she premiered at Tanglewood in 2021. Completing the program is Bartók’s uniquely dramatic Concerto for Orchestra, one of the BSO’s most famous commissions, originally premiered by Serge Koussevitzky in 1944.

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    Sep 30, 2021 - 8:00pm

    Oct 2, 2021 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Looking down the center aisle of Symphony Hall with a full house and stage

    Concert for our City: Reunited at Symphony Hall

    In March 2020, the BSO performed what would prove to be the last live performance in front of an audience at Symphony Hall for over a year. While we continued to share our music virtually, and then throughout the neighborhoods of Boston and at our summer home at Tanglewood, we are thrilled to finally reconnect with our Symphony Hall audiences this fall.

    It is our pleasure to invite you to a free celebration concert on Sunday, October 3 at 3pm. Concert for Our City: Reunited at Symphony Hall will feature the BSO’s four conductors and special guest soloist, Anne-Sophie Mutter.

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    Oct 3, 2021 - 3:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Christina and Michelle Naughton sitting together, smiling

    Andris Nelsons conducts Strauss and Mozart featuring pianists Christina and Michelle Naughton

    Andris Nelsons is joined by sisters Christina and Michelle Naughton for Mozart’s Concerto in E-flat for two pianos. Mozart probably wrote this elegant and brilliant concerto for himself and his sister Nännerl to play in about 1779; they had been performing together as siblings since early childhood. Maestro Nelsons continues his multi-season exploration of Richard Strauss’s music with both the BSO and the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig. A rarely heard scene from the composer’s legend-based 1901 opera Feuersnot— music not performed by the BSO since 1911—opens the program, followed by the composer’s beautiful and profound symphonic poem Death and Transfiguration.

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    Oct 7, 2021 - 8:00pm

    Oct 8, 2021 - 1:30pm

    Oct 9, 2021 - 8:00pm

    Oct 12, 2021 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Lisa Batiashvilli holding her violin in her right hand while leaning against a wall.

    Andris Nelsons conducts Still, Strauss, and Sibelius featuring violinist Lisa Batiashvili

    Acclaimed Georgian violinist Lisa Batiashvili returns to Symphony Hall for performances of Jean Sibelius’s Violin Concerto. A violinist himself, Sibelius employed his distinctive, Finnish folk music-influenced style in this fiery and lyrical concerto, the final version of which was premiered under Richard Strauss’s direction in 1905. Strauss’s own Symphonic Fantasy on Die Frau ohne Schatten (“Woman Without a Shadow”) is a 1946 distillation of his fabulist 1919 opera; the BSO hasn’t played music from the opera since the 1960s under Erich Leinsdorf. The concert opens with the great American composer William Grant Still’s Threnody: In Memoriam Jan Sibelius, composed in 1965. Though from very different traditions, Still and Sibelius were known to admire one another’s music.

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    Oct 14, 2021 - 8:00pm

    Oct 15, 2021 - 1:30pm

    Oct 16, 2021 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Andris Nelsons conducts Still, Strauss, and Bartók

    Andris Nelsons and the BSO continue their multi-season focus on music of Richard Strauss with his own Symphonic Fantasy on Die Frau ohne Schatten (“Woman Without a Shadow”), a 1946 orchestral distillation of his fabulist 1919 opera. The BSO hasn’t played music from the opera since the 1960s under Erich Leinsdorf. The concert opens with the great American composer William Grant Still’s Threnody: In Memoriam Jan Sibelius, composed in 1965. Though from very different traditions, Still and Sibelius were known to admire one another’s music. Closing this single-concert program is perhaps the BSO’s most famous commissioned work: Bartók’s Concerto for Orchestra, music premiered by the BSO under Serge Koussevitzky’s direction in December 1944.

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    Oct 19, 2021 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Andris Nelsons conducting, with his arms up and smiling

    Andris Nelsons conducts Gubaidulina and Rachmaninoff

    This all-Russian program led by Andris Nelsons opens with a BSO-commissioned piece by Sofia Gubaidulina, premiered by the orchestra under Kurt Masur’s direction in 2003. The work’s uniquely colorful harmonies and instrumental colors create its expressive drama. The title refers to the bright sound of antique cymbals at its conclusion. These performances celebrate Sofia Gubaidulina’s 90th birthday on October 24, 2021.

    Rachmaninoff’s Symphony No. 3 dates from 1936, falling between the Paganini Rhapsody for piano and orchestra and Symphonic Dances. Like those works, the symphony is characterized by scintillating orchestration and Rachmaninoff’s noted gift for long-spun melody and compelling musical narrative.

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    Oct 21, 2021 - 8:00pm

    Oct 22, 2021 - 1:30pm

    Oct 23, 2021 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Victor Wooten sitting in front of an upside-down electric bass

    Thomas Wilkins conducts Coleridge-Taylor, Wooten, and Ellington featuring electric bassist Victor Wooten

    BSO Artistic Advisor for Education and Community Engagement Conductor Thomas Wilkins is joined by composer and electric bass virtuoso Victor Wooten making his BSO debut. A multi-Grammy winner consistently ranked among the greatest bassists in the world, Wooten puts his own eclectic chops to the test in his concerto La Lección Tres, which continues the musical-philosophical journey of his book The Music Lesson. Anglo African composer Samuel Coleridge Taylor came to international prominence with his 1898 cantata on Longfellow’s epic poem The Song of Hiawatha. In 1912, Coleridge-Taylor recast this popular work as a ballet score; it was his last completed piece. Duke Ellington’s 1970 ballet The River, commissioned by the American Ballet Theatre for choreographer Alvin Ailey, follows an allegorical river’s changing nature from its source to the sea—i.e., from birth to "the heavenly anticipation of rebirth. The October 29 performance is part of our Casual Fridays series.

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    Oct 28, 2021 - 8:00pm

    Oct 29, 2021 - 8:00pm

    Oct 30, 2021 - 8:00pm

    Oct 31, 2021 - 3:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Beatrice Rana standing in front of a piano

    Dima Slobodeniouk conducts Tchaikovsky and Dvořák featuring pianist Beatrice Rana

    Exciting Italian pianist Beatrice Rana plays the towering Piano Concerto No. 1 in her BSO debut in concerts led by Russian conductor Dima Slobodeniouk. One of the most popular and evergreen concertos in the repertoire, Tchaikovsky’s piece never fails to please with its combination of virtuoso fireworks and soaring melody. The concert concludes with Dvořák’s darkly majestic Symphony No. 7, which reveals both his love for his native Bohemia and the influence of his mentor, Johannes Brahms.

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    Nov 4, 2021 - 8:00pm

    Nov 5, 2021 - 1:30pm

    Nov 6, 2021 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Genevieve Lefevre

    Family Concert Peter and the Wolf

    Boston Youth Symphony Orchestras (BYSO)
    Federico Cortese, conductor
    Genevieve Lefevre, narrator


    PROKOFIEV Peter and the Wolf

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    Nov 13, 2021 - 12:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Roderick Cox headshot

    Roderick Cox conducts Mozart and Mendelssohn featuring Principal BSO clarinetist William R. Hudgins

    American conductor Roderick Cox, makes his BSO debut leading BSO Principal Clarinet William Hudgins in Mozart’s beloved Clarinet Concerto. One of the composer’s last major works, it was written for his clarinetist friend Anton Stadler, perhaps the greatest master of the instrument of his time. Felix Mendelssohn’s always fresh Symphony No. 3, Scottish, was inspired by a long trip to the British Isles in his early twenties, but it wasn’t until more than a decade later that he finally completed this dramatic but classically balanced symphony.

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    Nov 11, 2021 - 10:30am

    Nov 11, 2021 - 8:00pm

    Nov 12, 2021 - 1:30pm

    Nov 13, 2021 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Hakan Hardenberger standing with his trumpet in his hand

    Andris Nelsons conducts Widmann and Mahler featuring Håkan Hardenberger, trumpet

    Adventurous Swedish trumpeter Håkan Hardenberger has collaborated frequently with Andris Nelsons and the BSO in a range of exciting works. This season he plays the American premiere of a BSO co-commissioned work by Jörg Widmann—the second BSO commission from the prominent German composer. Widmann, himself a noted clarinetist, creates imaginatively dramatic works with deep roots in music history.
    The first of Mahler’s nine symphonies employs folk-music references and a conventional four-movement form that have their foundations in Haydn’s time. Its expanded scope and instrumentation are evidence of the genre’s 19th-century transformation as well as Mahler’s own stretching of the form.

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    Nov 18, 2021 - 8:00pm

    Nov 19, 2021 - 1:30pm

    Nov 20, 2021 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Andris Nelsons headshot

    Andris Nelsons conducts an All-Brahms Program

    Andris Nelsons leads an all-Brahms program pairing early and mid-career orchestral works. Concerned with living up to Beethoven’s precedent in the genre, Brahms labored on his First Symphony for twenty years before finally allowing it to see the light of day in 1876. With references to Beethoven, Brahms clearly places himself in the great German symphonic tradition. The warm and idyllic Serenade No. 2, written in 1859, is a five-movement work that omits violins, creating strong contrasts between strings and woodwinds. This lovely piece was dedicated to Brahms’s lifelong friend Clara Schumann.

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    Nov 23, 2021 - 8:00pm

    Nov 26, 2021 - 1:30pm

    Nov 27, 2021 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Hillary Hahn holds her violin against a blue background

    Andris Nelsons conducts HK Gruber, Mozart, and Prokofiev featuring Hilary Hahn, violin

    Andris Nelsons leads a world premiere originally scheduled for spring 2020, the Viennese composer HK Gruber’s Short Stories from the Vienna Woods, a BSO co-commission with the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig. This orchestral score is a suite of music from the composer’s opera Tales from the Vienna Wood, based on the socially critical play by the same name by Ödön von Horváth. The title’s reference to the famous Strauss waltz mirrors the wide- ranging popular and classical variety of Gruber’s music.
    Though he would later be the embodiment of the Viennese Classical composer, Wolfgang Mozart was still living in Salzburg when he wrote all five of his violin concertos. Beloved American violinist Hilary Hahn plays Mozart’s Concerto No. 5, from 1775, which in addition to its energy and elegance is notable for its unusual finale, which features the surprising “Turkish” episode that gives the concerto its nickname.
    The BSO under Serge Koussevitzky gave the American premiere of Sergei Prokofiev’s Symphony No. 5 in 1945. Written in 1944, the symphony looks beyond the turmoil of World War II to celebrate the nobility of the human spirit.

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    Jan 6, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Jan 7, 2022 - 1:30pm

    Jan 8, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Mitsuko Uchida sitting next to a Steinway piano with her head resting on her hand

    Andris Nelsons conducts Augusta Read Thomas and Beethoven featuring pianist Mitsuko Uchida

    One of the finest pianists of the Classical repertoire, Mitsuko Uchida joins Andris Nelsons and the BSO for two very different Beethoven concertos, the start of a multi-season Beethoven collaboration with Ms. Uchida. The Concerto No. 2 was actually composed before the work we know as No. 1, but Beethoven published them in reverse order. Completed by about 1795, the piece is strongly rooted in the Viennese style of Mozart. The Concerto No. 4 dates from a decade later. It opens, unusually, with a few bars of solo piano, a chordal passage that introduces the work’s overall lyrical and elegant character. Opening these concerts is the American premiere of Augusta Read Thomas' Dance Foldings.

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    Jan 13, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Jan 14, 2022 - 1:30pm

    Jan 15, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Jan 16, 2022 - 3:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Elim Chan standing against a black background

    Elim Chan conducts Brahms, Brian Raphael Nabors, and Tchaikovsky featuring pianist Igor Levit

    Hong Kong-born conductor Elim Chan, chief conductor of the Antwerp Symphony Orchestra, makes her BSO debut and acclaimed Russian-German pianist Igor Levit makes his BSO subscription series debut in these concerts. Mr. Levit performs Brahms’s Piano Concerto No. 2, a work of grand scope and widely varying character and requiring great virtuosity. The young Alabama-born composer Brian Raphael Nabors’s orchestral work Pulse aims to suggest, in several contrasting episodes, the unifying energy of many different facets of life on earth. The nickname of Tchaikovsky’s colorful and dynamic Little Russian Symphony refers not to his homeland, but to a part of the Ukraine then known as “Little Russia”; the nickname comes from the Ukrainian folk melodies used in the piece.

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    Jan 20, 2022 - 10:30am

    Jan 20, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Jan 21, 2022 - 1:30pm

    Jan 22, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Boston Symphony Chamber Players performing at Jordan Hall

    Boston Symphony Chamber Players

    Jennifer HIGDON Autumn Music, for wind quintet
    Marti EPSTEIN Komorebi, for oboe, clarinet, and violin
    Shulamit RAN Lyre of Orpheus, for string sextet
    FARRENC Nonet for winds and strings

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    Nov 7, 2021 - 3:00pm

    Jordan Hall, Boston, MA

  • Boston Symphony Chamber Players performing at Jordan Hall

    Boston Symphony Chamber Players

    BARTÓK Contrasts, for clarinet, violin, and piano
    Michael GANDOLFI Cantata, for soprano, baritone, and ensemble (world premiere; BSO commission)
    DVOŘÁK String Quintet in G, Op. 77

    with
    Vivian Choi, piano
    Sophia Burgos, soprano
    John Brancy, baritone

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    Jan 23, 2022 - 3:00pm

    Jordan Hall, Boston, MA

  • Black and white portrait of Thomas Adés

    Thomas Adès conducts Berg, Ravel, and Thomas Adès featuring pianist Kirill Gerstein

    BSO Artistic Partner Thomas Adès is joined by pianist Kirill Gerstein in reprise performances of Adès’s own Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, a BSO-commissioned work written for Gerstein and premiered at Symphony Hall in 2019. Gerstein and Adès have since performed the concerto worldwide to great acclaim, and the BSO’s recording of it was nominated for a Grammy Award. Gerstein also performs Ravel’s Piano Concerto for the Left Hand, which Ravel completed in 1930 for the pianist Paul Wittgenstein, who lost his right arm due to an injury in World War I. Ravel’s fascination with jazz shows up in the concerto’s syncopated rhythms and energy. Exhibiting stark differences as well as fascinating similarities, both Ravel’s La Valse and Berg’s Three Pieces for Orchestra—written a few years apart during and after World War I—seem to be modern commentaries, both admiring and critical, of the music and society of a bygone 19th century Europe.

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    Jan 27, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Jan 28, 2022 - 1:30pm

    Jan 29, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Jakub Hrůša, conductor with his arms crossed, holding a baton and smiling

    Jakub Hrůša conducts Dvořák and Janáček

    Czech conductor Jakub Hrůša is joined by the Tanglewood Festival Chorus in its first BSO concerts since February 2020 in Leoš Janáček’s Glagolitic Mass an affirmation of the composer’s deep-seated identity as a Czech composer and as a Slav. Its music style is colored by Slavic traditional and sacred music, and sounds both ancient and very modern. Opening the program is Janáček’s great Czech predecessor Antonín Dvořák’s Symphony No. 6. One of the finest of Romantic symphonies, it was written for the prestigious Vienna Philharmonic and conductor Hans Richter.

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    Feb 3, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Feb 4, 2022 - 1:30pm

    Feb 5, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Yefrim Bronfman portrait

    Philippe Jordan conducts Borodin, Rachmaninoff, and Prokofiev featuring Yefim Bronfman, piano

    Swiss-born conductor Philippe Jordan, music director of the Vienna State Opera, makes his BSO debut in this all-Russian program alongside a BSO audience favorite, Israeli- American pianist Yefim Bronfman. Bronfman is soloist in one of the most beloved and challenging concertos in the repertoire, Rachmaninoff’s sparkling and lush Piano Concerto No. 3. Opening and closing the program is colorful music from the stage. The brilliantly orchestrated overture to Borodin’s incomplete opera Prince Igor (1887) evokes the dramatic sweep of the Russian legend and history that are the opera’s foundation. One of Prokofiev’s most recognizable and popular scores, the Shakespearean ballet Romeo and Juliet features character pieces from the delightful to the threatening, here distilled into an orchestral suite.

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    Feb 10, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Feb 11, 2022 - 1:30pm

    Feb 12, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Feb 13, 2022 - 3:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Herbert Blomstedt wearing a white shirt with a red sweater

    Herbert Blomstedt conducts Mozart and Bruckner featuring pianist Martin Helmchen

    The prominent American-born Swedish conductor Herbert Blomstedt, a frequent and welcome guest of the BSO, is joined by Swiss pianist Martin Helmchen for one of Mozart’s most joyous concertos, No. 17 in G. One of few Mozart piano concertos he probably didn’t write for himself to play, No. 17 may have been written for and premiered by his student Barbara Ployer in June 1784. Bruckner wrote his warm, majestic Fourth Symphony in 1874, but like many of his works the composer subjected it to extensive revision. The 1880 version of the score premiered by Hans Richter in Vienna in 1881 was one of the greatest success of Bruckner’s life.

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    Feb 17, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Feb 18, 2022 - 1:30pm

    Feb 19, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Boston Symphony Chamber Players performing at Jordan Hall

    Boston Symphony Chamber Players

    HINDEMITH Octet for winds and strings
    Yehudi WYNER Concord 7, for flute, oboe, clarinet, violin, viola, cello, and piano
    MOZART String Quintet in D, K.593

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    Feb 20, 2022 - 3:00pm

    Jordan Hall, Boston, MA

  • Baiba Skride sitting with her violin in her hands

    Andris Nelsons conducts Pärt, Kaija Saariaho, Shostakovich and Stravinsky featuring violinist Baiba Skride and Anu Komsi, soprano

    BSO Music Director Andris Nelsons is joined by his compatriot, violinist Baiba Skride, for Shostakovich’s Violin Concerto No. 1, which was written in the late 1940s but only premiered in 1955, after Stalin’s death helped relax the constraints on artistic expression in the USSR. The concerto contains a version of the composer’s musical “signature,” suggesting that was a work of powerful personal importance. It was composed for and dedicated to David Oistrakh. Opening the program is the Estonian composer Arvo Pärt’s poignant homage to Shostakovich’s great friend, the English composer Benjamin Britten.
    Finnish soprano Anu Komsi makes her BSO debut in the world premiere of Kaija Saariaho’s own orchestrations of her song cycle on poems of the great 20th century Finnish poet Pentti Saarikoski. Saariaho wrote the original piano and voice versions of these songs for Anu Komsi. The Suite from Stravinsky’s 1909 ballet score The Firebird closes the program. The composer’s astonishingly imaginative orchestration perfectly captured the magical atmosphere of this Russian legend, and the Ballets Russes premiere in Paris swept the composer to worldwide fame.

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    Feb 24, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Feb 25, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Feb 26, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Mar 1, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Leonidas Kavakos sitting and smiling

    Andris Nelsons conducts Ives, Unsuk Chin, and Berlioz featuring Leonidas Kavakos, violin

    Music Director Andris Nelsons is joined by one of his frequent collaborators, violinist Leonidas Kavakos, for the American premiere of celebrated Korean-German composer Unsuk Chin’s Violin Concerto No. 2, Scherben der Stille (“Shards of Silence”). Co-commissioned for Mr. Kavakos by the BSO, Gewandhaus Orchester Leipzig, and the London Symphony Orchestra, the concerto receives its U.S. premiere in March 2022 at Symphony Hall. Chin won the prestigious Grawemeyer Award in 2004 for her first violin concerto. A staple of the BSO’s repertoire for generations, Hector Berlioz’s Symphonie fantastique virtually defined the emotional intensity of musical Romanticism while also vastly expanding orchestral virtuosity. Opening the program is the American composer Charles Ives’s mysterious, innovative tone poem The Unanswered Question (1908), which features a striking solo trumpet part.

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    Mar 3, 2022 - 10:30am

    Mar 3, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Mar 4, 2022 - 1:30pm

    Mar 5, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Christina Goerke headshot

    Andris Nelsons conducts Berg's Wozzeck

    Andris Nelsons and the BSO continue the orchestra’s tradition of presenting great operatic works in concert with Alban Berg’s modernist masterpiece Wozzeck, which follows recent performances of early 20th-century operas by Richard Strauss and Puccini as well as complete acts from Wagner’s music dramas. First performed in 1925 and based on Georg Büchner’s mid-19th century play, Wozzeck uses a kaleidoscopic variety of musical means to relate the story a lowly soldier whose anxious, introspective humanity conflicts tragically with the circumstances of his life. The title role is sung by an acknowledged champion of the role, Danish baritone Bo Skovhus. The outstanding cast also includes soprano Christine Goerke as Marie.

    Concert performance, sung in German with English supertitles

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    Mar 10, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Mar 12, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Andris Nelsons conducts Ives and Berlioz

    Music Director Andris Nelsons leads two very different works that we both innovative and experimental for their time. A staple of the BSO’s repertoire for generations, Hector Berlioz’s Symphonie fantastique virtually defined the emotional intensity of musical Romanticism while also vastly expanding orchestral virtuosity. Its five movements describe an artist’s emotional turmoil, ranging from blissful to unhinged, as he daydreams about his lover. Much more abstract and metaphysical is the American composer Charles Ives’s mysterious and questing tone poem The Unanswered Question (1908), which features a striking solo trumpet part against ensembles of strings and winds.

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    Mar 11, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • portrait of Antonio Pappano

    Sir Antonio Pappano conducts Britten's War Requiem

    2022 marks the 60th anniversary of Benjamin Britten’s War Requiem, which was commissioned to mark the consecration of the rebuilt Coventry Cathedral in London, destroyed during a bombing raid in World War II. Britten’s piece takes a firm pacifist stance, setting World War I-era poetry by Wilfred Owen—sung by the two male soloists—interleaved with his setting of the traditional Latin mass for the dead. The Boston Symphony Orchestra gave the American premiere of this great work at Tanglewood in 1963 under Erich Leinsdorf. As was conceived for the work’s first performances, the soloists in this performance represent the warring powers of Russia, England, and Germany. British-Italian conductor Antonio Pappano conducts this concert also featuring the Tanglewood Festival Chorus and Boston Symphony Children’s Choir.

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    Mar 31, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Apr 1, 2022 - 1:30pm

    Apr 2, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Anna Rakitina smiling and holding a conductor's baton

    Anna Rakitina conducts Tchaikovsky, Ellen Reid and Sibelius featuring pianist Alexandre Kantorow

    Having made her Symphony Hall debut in the BSO’s streamed concerts of 2020–21, Assistant Conductor Anna Rakitina conducts her first live-audience Symphony Hall program featuring the BSO debut of French pianist Alexandre Kantorow. The grand prix winner in the 2019 Tchaikovsky Competition performs Tchaikovsky’s rarely heard Piano Concerto No. 2, an attractive work long overshadowed by the composer’s immensely popular Concerto No. 1. Tennessee-born composer Ellen Reid won the 2019 Pulitzer Prize in Music for her opera p r i s m. Her 2019 orchestral score When the World as You’ve Known it Doesn’t Exist revels in energy and pure orchestral sound; the instrumental ensemble is enhanced by the earthy sounds of three soprano voices. Sibelius’s one-movement Symphony No. 7, one of his last completed works, was an entirely personal reinvention of the genre that had occupied him for almost forty years and which was closely tied to landscape and culture of Finland.

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    Apr 7, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Apr 8, 2022 - 1:30pm

    Apr 9, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Boston Symphony Chamber Players performing at Jordan Hall

    Boston Symphony Chamber Players

    GLINKA Trio pathétique in D minor for clarinet, bassoon, and piano
    Sofia GUBAIDULINA Sonata for double bass and piano
    Elena LANGER Reflections on Water, for ensemble
    SHOSTAKOVICH Piano Quintet in G minor, Op. 57

    with
    Inon Barnatan, piano

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    Apr 10, 2022 - 3:00pm

    Jordan Hall, Boston, MA

  • Joshua Bell holding his violin while sitting outside

    Alan Gilbert conducts Bernard Rands, Debussy and Beethoven featuring Joshua Bell, violin

    Superstar violinist Joshua Bell joins conductor Alan Gilbert for Beethoven’s expansive Violin Concerto, one of the most popular violin concertos of all time. Composed almost simultaneously with his opera Leonore, the concerto features some of the composer’s warmest and most lyrical music. Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Bernard Rands’s music has been championed by the BSO over the course of his career; the orchestra most recently premiered his Concerto for Piano with soloist Jonathan Biss in 2014. The premiere of his Symphonic Fantasy was originally scheduled for summer 2020. Completing the program is Claude Debussy’s picturesque, symphony-like masterpiece La Mer, in which the composer paints a musical picture of the sea’s many moods and colors. The BSO gave the American premiere of La Mer in 1907.

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    Apr 14, 2022 - 10:30am

    Apr 14, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Apr 15, 2022 - 1:30pm

    Apr 16, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Lise Davidson sitting down with her hands on a desk

    Andris Nelsons conducts an All Strauss program featuring Lise Davidsen, soprano

    Andris Nelsons’ multi-season focus on the music of Richard Strauss with both the BSO and the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig culminates in two concerts at the close of the 2021–2022 season. The celebrated Norwegian soprano Lise Davidsen sings the composer’s final musical statements, his powerful and gorgeous Four Last Songs—a lasting tribute to his wife, the singer Pauline de Ahna. The symphonic poem Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks follows the madcap and sometimes tender antics of the title character, based on a famous rogue in German history. Strauss’s own family are the stars of his Symphonia domestica, which manages to elevate to artistry the musical depiction of a day in the life of two busy parents— by turns quarrelsome and loving—and their exuberant young son.

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    Apr 21, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Andris Nelsons conducts an All Strauss program

    The second of the All-Strauss programs includes the symphonic poem Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks, his Symphonia domestica, and his own Symphonic Fantasy on Die Frau ohne Schatten (“Woman Without a Shadow”), a 1946 distillation of his fabulist 1919 opera.

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    Apr 22, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Apr 23, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Apr 26, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Full Boston Youth Symphony Orchestra on stage at Symphony Hall

    BSO/ BYSO Family Concert

    The BSO’s Family Concert Series provides engaging, age appropriate, educational orchestral concert experiences especially for children ages 3–8 and their families. BSO Family Concerts are designed to build connections to the orchestra, orchestral music, the Boston Youth Symphony Orchestras, and Symphony Hall.

    Petit Ensemble
    Marta Żurad, conductor
    Matt Roberts, magician

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    Apr 23, 2022 - 12:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Headshot of Marlis Petersen

    Andris Nelsons conducts an All Strauss program featuring Marlis Petersen, soprano

    The final program of the 2021–2022 season is the culmination of Andris Nelsons’ and the BSO’s multi-season exploration of Richard Strauss’s music. Soprano Marlis Petersen sings the role of Salome in the psychologically intense final scene of Strauss’s opera, in which Salome, transported by her own sensual power, addresses the decapitated head of John the Baptist. Preceding this chilling scene is the wild and exotic Dance of the Seven Veils, the means by which she seduces her stepfather Herod into promising her John the Baptist’s head on a silver platter. Strauss’s absolute mastery of the orchestra is put to very different use in the tone poem An Alpine Symphony, which musically illustrates nature in all its glory via the climb and descent of a mountain in the Alps.

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    Apr 28, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Apr 29, 2022 - 1:30pm

    Apr 30, 2022 - 8:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA

  • Thomas Wilkins Conducting a Youth Concert

    So Now What: A Musical Look at Anticipation, Expectation, and a New Certainty Toward the Fulfillment of Our Promise

    The BSO’s Family Concert Series provides engaging, age appropriate, educational orchestral concert experiences especially for children ages 3–8 and their families. BSO Family Concerts are designed to build connections to the orchestra, orchestral music, the Boston Youth Symphony Orchestras, and Symphony Hall. The BSO offers three Family Concert programs per year, one of which is performed by the BSO and conducted by Germeshausen Youth and Family Concerts Conductor Thomas Wilkins, the other two of which are performed by the Boston Youth Symphony Orchestras (BYSO) as part of a larger organizational partnership.

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    May 7, 2022 - 10:00am

    May 7, 2022 - 12:00pm

    Symphony Hall, Boston, MA